Freaking Out and Lacquered Walls

Classes started again last week; on Saturday I had my first Interior Decorating 1 class and I’m admitting right now that I’m scared. So far the courses I’ve taken have been a little easy – no actual decorating happening. That’s going to change with this class, and I’m currently experiencing an overwhelming feeling of terror.

I’m absolutely terrified that I’ve made a huge mistake. What am I doing going back to school? Where in the hell did I get the idea that I had any sort of skill at actually decorating a room? There’s so much to think about, and source, and pull together, and I haven’t any idea what I’m doing, and there’s a looming deadline for the project and I don’t think I can have it done in time. Oh my God – what have I done???

*Breathe*

One of the projects for my class (one of two that are terrifying me) is to take an image from a fashion magazine that has a triadic colour scheme and translate that into a contemporary living room. After hours of searching (mostly at Chapters since I don’t own a single fashion magazine) I ended up with one from a issue of Fashion magazine from 2009 that is predominantly navy blue (And yes, I used the term ‘ended up with’- what’s with current magazines only having monochromatic or black and white fashion spreads? How terribly boring.).

Since I have to keep the colour ratio in my space the same as the image we’re using which means most of the room will have to be navy blue, and in order to accomplish that I’ll have to present a room with navy walls. This worried me for a while – how to do a contemporary room with dark walls given that when I think of a contemporary space I usually think sleek, modern, open, and mostly white with pops of bright colour.

Yesterday morning when I woke up it hit me – lacquer. Lacquer has been popping up more and more frequently in the magazines and blogs that I read and I’ve always rather loved it as it adds a little something extra and unexpected to rooms.

The image above is of Todd Romano’s Manhattan apartment, and it has laid to rest some of my fears about an all blue room feeling very traditional instead of contemporary. What do you think? Do the lacquered walls add to the contemporary feel to the space? Or am I simply grasping at straws?

Getting Plastered in my Dining Room

Remember back in July when I confessed that my dining room a had a small problem? That problem included globs of wallpaper glue, cracks, and a badly patched ceiling.Dining room - corner

Dining room ceilingFor my birthday my mom and dad gifted me a repaired dining room, so in late August operation #letsgetplastered begun (yes, this was finished in August and I’m just blogging about it now. I’m a bad blogger). My mom and dad are ‘the’ original DIYers so they decided that they’d try to fix it themselves first, and if that didn’t work we’d call in some hired guns for the job. Those hired guns weren’t needed.

First up my mom and I took a trip to Rona to pick up supplies. While there she introduced me to this amazing sanding block she’d seen while shopping in her hometown, and it was so helpful as we started my dining room rehabilitation by hand sanding the walls and ceiling the remove the old wallpaper glue, and try to even our some of the imperfections.

After the sanding was done it was on to a coat of primer, and then onto applying coats of spackling compound in layers to try to even out the walls. Once the last layer of spackle had been sanded it was time for another coat of primer, and then some plain white paint. The whole operation took about a week, and it was a huge success. There are still some imperfections, but it’s a thousand times better than it was, and honestly in an almost 100 year old building there isn’t a single wall that doesn’t have some character.

Teh After - My newly repaired wall and ceiling

The After – My newly repaired wall and ceiling

A New dining room deserves a  new light fixture

A new dining room deserves a new light fixture

For an unplanned bonus when lit the string light casts a neat shadow on the walls which makes any small imperfection even harder to see.

For an unplanned bonus when lit the string light casts a neat shadow on the walls which makes any small imperfection even harder to see.

I owe a HUGE thanks to my parents for my birthday present – I was going to pay someone a lot of money to fix the problem, but they’ve reminded me (again) that if you put your mind to it, have a willingness to try something new, some patience and a bit of help, there are a lot of things you can do yourself.My newly repaired dining room

PS – My apologies – an all white room is hard to photograph for a relative novice.

PPS – RONA doesn’t know I’m posting about the sanding blocks – I just loved them.

Monday Morning Love – David Collins Livingroom

Good Morning! Are any of you wondering where the weekend went – I know I am. I think it’s because last weekend was a long one due to Thanksgiving, and I’m rather partial to long weekends so wish every weekend was at least three days long.

I came across this image a while back and I fell instantly in love. This was the living room of David Collins, who was an Irish Architect and Interior Designer based in London.

Living room by David Collins. Image from AD Spain, Dec. 2009 found here

Living room by David Collins. Image from AD Spain, Dec. 2009 found here

I love how the room is comprised of mostly blue hues, but with a small pops of gold, and the stunning purple artwork. It’s a very masculine space, and even though it was designed 4+ years ago I think it’s timeless. I’m quite smitten with the royal blue sofa upholstered in velvet and want to curl up on it with a good book.

What do you think? Do you like this space as much as I do? If you could use one thing in this room in your home what would it be?

PS – I couldn’t find the original image on the AD Spain website. It and more shots of David Collins’ apartment can be found here.